Richard Lochhead MSP

Welcome to Richard Lochhead MSP's biography pages

Richard Lochhead MSP

Here you can find out about your MSPs' political activities and how to get in touch with them.

  • Member for: Moray
  • Region: Highlands and Islands
  • Party: Scottish National Party

Richard is a member of the following Committees:

Richard is a member of the following Cross-Party Groups:

Parliamentary Activities

Search for other Speeches made by Richard Lochhead

Meeting of the Parliament 20 November 2014 : Thursday, November 20, 2014
Richard Lochhead

Yes. Our children’s food policy must be about not just food education in our schools but what happens in the private sector. As the father of two young children, I get immensely frustrated when I take my children out and about in Scotland or elsewhere and I find the choice on the children’s menu either very poor or very limited and quite often inappropriate. That is one reason why I am very keen for better children’s food in Scotland to be at the heart of the next phase of our national food policy.

Many people have also raised the issue of affordability. Although a lot is happening to reach out to many people in our communities and give them more of an opportunity to enjoy affordable food, it is absolutely sickening to witness millionaire Tories around the UK Cabinet table in London taking money out of the pockets of families in Scotland, who now can barely afford to put food on their own tables. That, combined with the proliferation of food banks in Scotland—which is a scandal in itself—is one reason why welfare policy should be devolved to this Parliament as soon as possible.

I will ensure that on the food commission that we are setting up there are strong voices and people who have experience of food poverty in Scotland. That is what the food commission is going to be all about: looking at the big challenges facing our society over not just the next 10 years but beyond, whether it is food security issues, food poverty issues or others. We will appoint key people from Scottish society to the food commission to advise us, and there will be local champions in every community around Scotland taking forward the food agenda.

We have the vision to take Scotland forward in the “Becoming a Good Food Nation” document, and I think that we can all sign up to it. As I said in my opening remarks, when in 10 years’ time people around Europe or the world think of good food nations, they will no doubt think of Italy and France but they will also think of Scotland.

I commend the motion to Parliament.



Meeting of the Parliament 20 November 2014 : Thursday, November 20, 2014
Richard Lochhead

That is a good point, which I will address shortly.

I have listed some of the key achievements since 2007. What is really exciting is what will happen in the future. The Bank of Scotland report, which many members quoted, states that 66 per cent of businesses expect to increase their workforce in the years ahead; that 75 per cent expect their sales and exports to go up by 15 per cent; that 58 per cent want to engage more with international customers; and that thousands of job opportunities are likely to be in the pipeline. That shows that the successes of the past few years are still only scratching the surface. There is massive opportunity left to tap into, not just in terms of international demand but in terms of demand on our own doorstep.

Some members mentioned the barriers that small businesses, in particular, face when leaving the domestic market and going into the export market. However, many companies have done that successfully. For example, the Innis & Gunn Brewing Company, which we are all familiar with—it is based not far from Parliament—has been going for only a few years but, in the past four years, it has seen a 9,000 per cent increase in sales to North America and is now the second-biggest beer in Canada. That is a company that did not exist a few years ago, but just look at its achievements. That is a familiar story for many of the companies that we speak to.

We are holding events in Scotland with small and medium-sized businesses and are trying to encourage them to get into the export markets and meet international buyers who we invite to Scotland. For example, the showcasing Scotland event that was held in July set up 600 meetings in this country between local companies and international buyers. We have taken small businesses on learning journeys overseas to some of the big food and drink exhibitions as well. That is proving to be productive. We also have the likes of Paul Grant, who built up the successful exports track record for the jam producer Mackays and who is now working for the dairy industry in Scotland to show how we can add value to dairy products so that those producers can take advantage of the massive export opportunities.

I agree with many members that success in this area is down to a partnership approach. I join Alex Fergusson and others in paying tribute to Scotland Food and Drink, and particularly to James Withers, who is a fantastic ambassador for food and drink in Scotland. As its chief executive, he has achieved much. I commend all his efforts and join others in paying tribute to the outgoing chair, Ray Jones.

I also pay tribute to SDI. International companies and, indeed, Scottish companies that operate overseas are full of praise for SDI and all the fantastic work that it is doing to get us into new overseas markets, as well as for what Scottish Enterprise is doing here in Scotland. I pay tribute to the various sectors and trade associations that are involved.

Ultimately, of course, it all comes down to people—our farmers, our fishermen and our crofters, who as a result of their ingenuity, their hard work and the traditions that they have built up over hundreds of years are producing the raw materials that underpin our fantastic food and drink industry. That is why our agricultural policy, our wider food policy and our fishing policy are all aimed at protecting Scotland’s food-producing capacity.

We are paying very close attention to TTIP, the international agreement that Alex Rowley has just referred to, because we do not want the European marketplace to be opened up to, for instance, cheap and inferior beef imports that do not have to meet the same standards as our own domestic production. There are a number of other concerns about what might come out of the TTIP arrangements. As I have said, we are paying very close attention to it and are making our concerns known to the UK Government and the European Commission.

I pay tribute to our primary producers; our manufacturers; our scientists and innovators, who are helping to develop the new products that are going out into the international marketplace; and, of course, our entrepreneurs. There are a phenomenal number of entrepreneurs in our food and drink industry, and they are achieving amazing things. Just like Walkers over 100 years ago, many of those companies are starting out small, but one day they are going to be big and employ even more people in this country.

Those of us who were lucky to attend last night’s VisitScotland reception will have enjoyed honey from Plan Bee, another new small business in Scotland, and they will also have seen IQ Chocolate, which is doing really well, the Wee Fudge Company and Taste of Arran, which some members have mentioned. All of those initiatives and companies are backed by entrepreneurialism and the talents of a few very ambitious, dedicated and passionate individuals. They are very inspirational, and we owe them a huge debt.

Last night’s event also served to remind us of the huge role that the food and drink industry can play in tourism for wider economic benefit. Indeed, the most popular visitor attraction in my Moray constituency is Glenfiddich whisky distillery, and many people will be familiar with the benefits of food-related tourism in their own areas. That is why 2015, the year of food and drink, is such a massive opportunity for Scotland.

Of course, this is not just about exports and tourists coming to Scotland but about people here in Scotland being able to afford and enjoy more of their own larder on their own doorstep. That theme has run through many of the speeches in this debate. We are trying to do some things to promote that larder, such as taste the best, which is an accreditation scheme for restaurants, hotels and the rest of Scotland’s hospitality sector. We are trying to get staff to explain to customers where the food is from and to ensure that more of Scotland’s larder is put on the menu; if that happens, the hotel, restaurant or whatever will get the taste the best accreditation.

Our public procurement policy as well as the nutritional standards in our hospitals and schools are also now reflecting the larder on our doorstep. We will continue to take that work forward.

As this is all about our children and future generations, we need to focus on food education. That is the real way to change this country’s food culture, and food education is playing a greater role than ever before. That is why children’s food is at the heart of and a new focus in “Becoming a Good Food Nation”, the next phase of our food policy.



Meeting of the Parliament 20 November 2014 : Thursday, November 20, 2014
Richard Lochhead

I thank all the members who have spoken in this debate on what could not be a more important issue for Scotland’s future and the wellbeing of our people. The fact that so many members mentioned the food culture of their local constituencies as well as of wider society, and the successful food and drink industries in their constituencies, highlights that we all recognise that the food and drink industry is massively important to Scotland’s economy.

I particularly welcomed Mike Mackenzie’s food and drink tour of the Highlands, which sounded nearly as good as what people would get if they visited Moray. Of course, as the MSP for 50 per cent of Scotch whisky, as well as Walkers Shortbread, Baxters, Maclean’s Highland Bakery and many other businesses, I pay close attention to the value to our local economies of the food and drink industry in Scotland, as was illustrated by many members around the chamber.

Whisky is not just an issue for the Highlands and Islands, the Western Isles or Speyside because, of course, the industry involves not only distilleries but bottling plants. I was struck by what George Adam, from Paisley, and Angus MacDonald, from Falkirk, said about the massive employment that depends on the bottling plants in those areas. Food and drink industries spread economic benefits throughout Scotland.

One thing that most speeches had in common was that they noted the fact that Scotland is experiencing a food and drink revolution. We can all see the evidence of that on our doorsteps and in the national statistics. Let us remind ourselves of what has been achieved in a few short years, as that should give us optimism and hope in relation to what can be achieved in the next few years.

Since 2007, turnover in the food and drink sector has increased and is now at £13.9 billion, which means that it achieved our growth targets six years early. There has been a 51 per cent increase in food and drink exports since 2007 and a 32 per cent increase in the sales of Scottish brands across retailers throughout these islands. Further, there has been a 50 per cent increase in farmers markets, and 150 new local food initiatives in the past 10 years alone.



Meeting of the Parliament 20 November 2014 : Thursday, November 20, 2014
Richard Lochhead

Thank you, Presiding Officer.

It was certainly the case that we made huge strides with the Commonwealth games. Compared with, perhaps, every previous Commonwealth games, there was much more local food for sale. I have spoken to many Scottish companies that benefited hugely from Glasgow 2014. It is the case—as the member has perhaps alluded to—that what we managed to achieve with the Ryder cup was absolutely fabulous, as there was perhaps more control for Scotland over some of the issues. However, both platforms were used to maximum effect for Scottish food and drink and this country’s reputation.

A legacy of Glasgow 2014 is the sustainable food charter, which was rolled out to the other major events, such as the Ryder cup and homecoming 2014, and which will feature strongly in the 2015 year of food and drink. It is no wonder that Cate Devine in The Herald called the food charter that we have developed—the first of its kind—“deeply impressive”. That is why we are now going to encourage the adoption of the food charter for every event, every organisation and hopefully—one day—every town and city in Scotland.

Along with those successes since 2007, there has been huge activity in other areas. Food is not just about sales and profit, and we have devoted unprecedented effort to food education, helping young people to understand the role that food plays in their lives and ensuring that they have the facts that they need at their disposal to make informed choices for their future.

We have also made real progress with the introduction of “Supporting Healthy Choices: A Framework for Voluntary Action” for the food industry to encourage consumers to make healthier choices, and we are working to ensure that the public sector is walking the walk and not just talking the talk. In 2007, the food in our schools and care homes was estimated to be 34 per cent sourced from Scotland; it is now estimated at just under 50 per cent, and that percentage is growing. Total expenditure on Scottish food and drink by the public sector in Scotland is now nearly £150 million.

As well as pupils, we want patients in our hospitals to enjoy good food. Scotland has led the way in the United Kingdom on developing and monitoring standards of nutritional care and catering in our hospitals. We have made good progress, but we recognise that we can do more to drive up standards, which is why we will consult on whether nutritional and catering standards in hospitals should be placed on a statutory footing.

We are debating an undisputed success story. “Recipe for Success” has achieved exactly what it says on the tin and Scotland has some of the best food and drink in the world and our reputation is world class. However, there are areas of unfinished business. In part, that is about continuing to be ambitious for the industry, and we are not resting on our laurels. My ambition, which I know is shared by leaders in the sector, is that in 10 years’ time Scotland should be well known throughout the world as one of the best places for food and drink businesses to be based.

More than that, there is something not quite right about our nation’s relationship with food. That presents a profound paradox that I am confronted with every day of my life, not just as a minister with responsibility for food but as a member of the public and, indeed, a parent. Our food quality may be world beating, but unfortunately we are also beating much of the world on diet-related ill health. The average waistline of Scottish men has grown by 2 inches in a decade and two thirds of Scots continue to be overweight or obese. The current obesity trend is set to cost Scotland £3 billion by 2030, and fruit and vegetable consumption among the poorest 20 per cent of the population has fallen by 20 per cent since the recession.

The problem goes wider than that: it is also about waste. We still throw away about a fifth of all the food that we purchase, which costs us more than £1 billion. We can learn a lot from food waste recycling, such as happened at Glasgow 2014.

While too many of us are buying and wasting too much food, too many of our fellow citizens cannot afford to put food on their tables. Food poverty in 21st century Scotland is a scandal that we all have a responsibility to tackle—820,000 people in this country are living in relative poverty. Everyone should have access to affordable healthy food. We recently announced an extra £1 million over the next three years to help to combat food poverty in Scotland and we want to ensure that those who use food banks as a result of the United Kingdom’s welfare reforms can access appropriate advice and support.

Our policy must also tackle ignorance, generally speaking, across the population, about what lies behind what we eat: where it comes from and how it is prepared. We have to create a culture that attaches greater importance to our food.

Today is not about reflecting on progress; it is about saying that we will no longer put up with all those paradoxes. That is why I am committed to making Scotland a good food nation. Scotland is already well known as a land of food and drink, but we also need to become known for the quality of the food that we serve, eat and sell day by day. It needs to become second nature that everyone in Scotland serves, eats and sells fresh and tasty food with sound health and environmental credentials.

We want everyone to know what constitutes good food and why. All players in Scottish life—from schools to hospitals, retailers, restaurants and manufacturers—should be committed to serving such food.

We know that becoming a good food nation will not be easy. The challenge requires commitment from all to change. It will take time, but the impact will affect future generations. The Scottish Government is fully behind the aspiration, which will be pursued with vigour under our new First Minister, reinforced by new powers resulting from the current constitutional process. Above all, a broad coalition for change, involving many areas, will be required. That is why in June I launched a discussion document: “Recipe For Success: Scotland’s National Food and Drink Policy—Becoming a Good Food Nation”. Its purpose was to start this phase of the debate about our food future. It sought people’s views on what it would mean to be a good food nation and what steps would have to be taken locally, nationally, at grass-roots level and so on. The consultation process closed in late October and we are currently analysing the responses.

We must understand what people think about our food and drink culture. As a starter for 10, we think that public food, local food and children’s food are the right areas to focus on more in future. Of course, that will be in tandem with our efforts on exports and economic growth—those are not mutually exclusive aspirations.

There will be other important issues and we will shortly be ready to establish a Scottish food commission to help us with them. The commission will have two roles. First, it will advise on the key areas that need to be taken forward. Secondly, it will advocate the importance of food to Scotland’s health, environment, economy and general quality of life. For Scotland to become a good food nation, it is vital that we involve everyone from all walks of life, which is why the commission’s work will be supported by a network of local champions the length and breadth of Scotland.

I make no apologies for the fact that becoming a good food nation will be a challenge for us all. It will not happen in one fell swoop; it will happen as we create together good food communities, villages, towns and regions the length and breadth of the country. However there is no better time for this to happen than now, with 2015 being the designated year of food and drink as part of the Government’s overarching tourism drive. That will provide further opportunity to showcase a fantastic industry, both at home and abroad, and to get people engaged in the debate.

A series of themes are being developed throughout the year and I hope that businesses and people across the country will harness all the opportunities available. Our food and drink sector is now well and truly in the spotlight and now is the time to capitalise on the strength of the industry—the provenance and the quality of our produce.

Becoming a good food nation and creating a good food culture will mean that, in 10 years’ time, when Europe or indeed the world thinks of good food, it thinks not only of Italy and France but of Scotland as well. That must be our aim and that is what we must achieve. I commend the motion to Parliament.

I move,

That the Parliament welcomes the achievements of Recipe for Success, Scotland’s first national food and drink policy; recognises the contribution that it has made to the unprecedented economic growth of the food and drink industry in Scotland and in export markets across the world; congratulates the primary producers and processors for their continued focus and commitment to quality and provenance; notes the increasing interest in local food and desire among consumers to know where their food comes from; welcomes the publication of the discussion document, Becoming a Good Food Nation, setting out the next steps for Scotland’s food and drink policy, and agrees that it must become second nature that Scots eat, serve and buy food that is healthy and environmentally sustainable if Scotland is to achieve the aspiration of becoming a good food nation.

14:45  

Meeting of the Parliament 20 November 2014 : Thursday, November 20, 2014
Richard Lochhead

The member makes a good point. It is ironic that we have fantastic, nutritious food on our doorstep but not enough people, particularly our children, enjoy and have access to it. If we can make that happen, it will also be good for our economy.

Returning to the promotion of Scottish food, I note that, since 2007, we have seen a 50 per cent increase in Scottish products with protected food names, combined with an increasing interest in where food comes from and more local produce on our menus. It is not just the people of Scotland who are increasingly seeking the quality food and drink that we have, but visitors to these shores as well. In a recent visitor survey, 49 per cent of visitors cited trying local food as one of the top activities that they undertook, and more than two thirds said that the quality of food was important when they chose Scotland as a destination. The world wants what we have, but we must not rest on our laurels. We must build on our success and continue to identify new markets.

It is amazing that a recent supplier development programme that cost less than £50,000 resulted in 35 Scottish food and drink companies benefiting from an additional £12.1 million in sales with one major retailer. With initiatives such as that, there is so much more that we can achieve. We must support businesses that want to grow their exports or start exporting, and the £4.5 million food export plan that was agreed earlier this year is a groundbreaking partnership between Government, the public sector and the private sector to support such efforts. It will direct our focus to priority markets and pool our resources to help industry to fully exploit the massive opportunities that are out there.

I am pleased to tell the Parliament today about two new additions to team Scotland. The first two of our new full-time overseas food experts are now in post in Toronto and Japan and are getting on with their jobs.



Meeting of the Parliament 20 November 2014 : Thursday, November 20, 2014
Richard Lochhead

The member’s suspicion may have some grounds. For many businesses it is daunting to get into exports, but those that have done so usually do not regret it and find that it is a lucrative marketplace. That is why a number of initiatives are in place to mentor and work with small and medium-sized enterprises, in particular, to help them to get into the international marketplace.

Of course, 2014 brought a huge boost to the reputation of Scottish food and drink. The eyes of the world were on Scotland, and our food and drink did not disappoint. We successfully delivered a fantastic offering at the Ryder cup, the Glasgow Commonwealth games and homecoming 2014. It is difficult to visualise, but more than 2 million meals were prepared for athletes, officials, media, the workforce and spectators at the Commonwealth games alone, and with such vast volumes of produce, Glasgow 2014 set a new gold standard in delivering major events in Scotland in a sustainable way.



Meeting of the Parliament 20 November 2014 : Thursday, November 20, 2014
The Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and the Environment (Richard Lochhead)

Food is something that we all enjoy and often take for granted. Today, we can reflect on its importance to Scotland and, indeed, to the world, because the world is, of course, changing. The world’s population is expected to increase from 7 billion today to 9 billion by 2050. It is estimated that 12 per cent of the world’s population, which is 842 million people, do not eat enough to be healthy. By 2030, the world is expected to need 40 per cent more water and 30 per cent more energy. Therefore, there is pressure on our resources like never before and, globally, food is and will remain a critical issue.

Here in Scotland we are fortunate because we are blessed with some of the most amazing natural resources anywhere on the planet. Our land, water and seas provide the foundation for the raw materials that underpin our fantastic food and drink industry, which is now one of the fastest-growing sectors in Scotland. However, it was not always like that.

Back in 2007, the Scottish Government started raising the profile of food and drink. It seems incredible today that, back then, there was no national food and drink policy. There was very little by way of a joined-up approach to growing an industry of such huge economic importance as food and drink. That position led to the first-ever national food and drink policy for Scotland—indeed, it was perhaps the first such policy in Europe—which was called “Recipe for Success—Scotland’s National Food and Drink Policy”, published in 2009. At its heart was a desire for active change.

Since then, the policy has come alive through the work of highly motivated and ambitious people all over Scotland at every level of society and, of course, in the business community. That focus has paid huge dividends, as the industry’s turnover is now £13.9 billion, representing the largest increase in turnover in Scotland, even outperforming oil and gas. Since 2007, there has been a 51 per cent increase in the value of food and drink exports and a 32 per cent increase in sales of Scottish food and drink brands across these islands. Initial growth targets were smashed an incredible full six years early.

However, perhaps we should not really be surprised at that success, given Scotland’s rich larder. Our Scotch beef and lamb are second to none and recognised by top chefs around the world. Our seafood from our pristine waters is also acclaimed worldwide. Our soft fruit, cereals and vegetables, including tatties, are renowned for their quality and taste. That is not all, though, because Scottish berries and oats are just two of our excellent products that provide particularly essential nutrients for our diet. For instance, Scottish porridge oats can help to maintain normal blood cholesterol and control our blood sugar levels, and berries provide an enjoyable and healthy addition to our diet, contributing to our five a day. In addition, in terms of drink, our famous Scotch whisky continues to be a global phenomenon, with an estimated 40 bottles per second shipped every day.

Importantly, that success is evident at the local level, with local sourcing and the celebration of Scottish produce also increasing dramatically. Indeed, there has been a 50 per cent increase in the number of farmers’ markets in Scotland and 150 new local food initiatives in the past 10 years. Through our work with Scotland’s Rural University College and our funding for a community food fund, we have seen 73 projects in the past two years alone celebrate our local produce the length and breadth of Scotland.



Meeting of the Parliament 18 November 2014 : Tuesday, November 18, 2014
Richard Lochhead

As I said, we are asking everyone to be vigilant, particularly the industry, which should report any dead birds immediately. However, the fact that the three recent outbreaks in Germany, in the Netherlands, and here on these islands have occurred in the proximity of damp areas with wild birds and the absence of any other possible link between the outbreaks points towards wild migratory birds as a possible source of the virus. However, the investigations are on-going. As soon as the facts are available, we will put them in the public domain.



Meeting of the Parliament 18 November 2014 : Tuesday, November 18, 2014
Richard Lochhead

I am confident that we have the arrangements in place. However, we must be very careful. At the moment, the strain that is known to cause a risk to human health has been ruled out. Therefore, we are speaking about a different strain. It is important to convey that message to the country and the poultry industry in particular.

We have contingency plans in place. We have a set of arrangements that will be urgently put in place, should the situation change at any point. However, this particular outbreak does not give rise to concerns of any threat to human health or food safety.



Meeting of the Parliament 18 November 2014 : Tuesday, November 18, 2014
Richard Lochhead

I can indeed give comfort to consumers and the member that the H5N1 strain, which is the strain that is known to cause risk to human health, has been ruled out in the three cases that are known about across the continent and down south. Therefore, the chief medical officer in England has said that there is a very low risk to public health, and the Food Standards Agency has said that there is no risk to food safety.

We continue to monitor the situation closely, of course, but I certainly agree that, as things stand, we can have full confidence in the Scottish product. Restrictions have, of course, been put in place on exports from this country. I hope that they will be only temporary while we wait to find out about the full scale of the outbreak.

Vote DetailMSP VoteResult

Selection of the Parliament's Nominee for First Minister
Not VotedCarried

Selection of the Parliament's Nominee for First Minister
YesCarried

Selection of the Parliament's Nominee for First Minister
Not VotedCarried

S4M-11567.2 Margaret Mitchell: Lowering the Drink Drive Limit—As an amendment to motion S4M-11567 in
>> Show more
YesCarried

S4M-11507.1 Cameron Buchanan: Progressive Workplace Policies to Boost Productivity, Growth and Jobs—
>> Show more
Not VotedDefeated

S4M-11507 Angela Constance: Progressive Workplace Policies to Boost Productivity, Growth and Jobs—Th
>> Show more
Not VotedCarried

S4M-11494.3 Jackie Baillie: Welfare Benefits for People Living with Disabilities—As an amendment to
>> Show more
NoDefeated

S4M-11494.2 Alex Johnstone: Welfare Benefits for People Living with Disabilities—As an amendment to
>> Show more
NoDefeated

S4M-11494 Margaret Burgess: Welfare Benefits for People Living with Disabilities—That the Parliament
>> Show more
YesCarried

S4M-11484.1 Jackson Carlaw: Human Rights—As an amendment to motion S4M-11484 in the name of Roseanna
>> Show more
NoDefeated

Search for other Motions lodged by Richard Lochhead
EventIdTypeSub TypeMSP NameParty NameConstituencyRegionTitleItemTextFormattedAnswer DateAnswerStatusIdExpectedAnswerDateAnsweredByMspApprovedDateSubmissionDateMeetingDateProductionStatusIdRecordStatusIdStatus DateOnBehalfOfConsideredForMembersBusinessCrossPartySupportRegisteredInterestSupportCountSupportDateIsEventLinkCurrentMinister
Motion S4M-11642: Richard Lochhead, Moray, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 20/11/2014 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-11598: Richard Lochhead, Moray, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 18/11/2014 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-10284: Richard Lochhead, Moray, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 10/06/2014 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-10052: Richard Lochhead, Moray, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 14/05/2014 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-09836: Richard Lochhead, Moray, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 28/04/2014 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-09333: Richard Lochhead, Moray, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 13/03/2014 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-08857: Richard Lochhead, Moray, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 27/01/2014 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-08540: Richard Lochhead, Moray, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 09/12/2013 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-07892: Richard Lochhead, Moray, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 01/10/2013 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-05898.3: Richard Lochhead, Moray, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 12/03/2013 Show Full Motion >>
This Member currently holds a ministerial post. First Minister and Ministers cannot ask the Government questions which is why no recent questions are displaying here. Please use the full search to find details of previous questions by this Member.
EventIdTypeSub TypeMSP NameParty NameConstituencyRegionTitleItemTextFormattedAnswer DateAnswerStatusIdExpectedAnswerDateAnsweredByMspApprovedDateSubmissionDateMeetingDateProductionStatusIdRecordStatusIdStatus DateOnBehalfOfConsideredForMembersBusinessCrossPartySupportRegisteredInterestSupportCountSupportDateIsEventLinkCurrentMinister
Question S2W-32678: Richard Lochhead, Moray, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 19/03/2007 Show Full Question >>
Question S2W-32679: Richard Lochhead, Moray, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 19/03/2007 Show Full Question >>
Question S2W-32685: Richard Lochhead, Moray, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 19/03/2007 Show Full Question >>
Question S2W-32692: Richard Lochhead, Moray, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 19/03/2007 Show Full Question >>
Question S2W-32680: Richard Lochhead, Moray, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 19/03/2007 Show Full Question >>
Question S2W-32683: Richard Lochhead, Moray, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 19/03/2007 Show Full Question >>
Question S2W-32684: Richard Lochhead, Moray, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 19/03/2007 Show Full Question >>
Question S2W-32681: Richard Lochhead, Moray, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 19/03/2007 Show Full Question >>
Question S2W-32682: Richard Lochhead, Moray, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 19/03/2007 Show Full Question >>
Question S2W-32693: Richard Lochhead, Moray, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 19/03/2007 Show Full Question >>

Further information

Email our Public Information Service for more information.