Patricia Ferguson MSP

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Meeting of the Parliament 20 January 2015 : Tuesday, January 20, 2015
Patricia Ferguson (Glasgow Maryhill and Springburn) (Lab)

I, too, congratulate Jim Eadie on securing the debate. His interest in international development is recognised by us all.

We should celebrate the 35th anniversary of Mercy Corps and, in doing so, we acknowledge the excellent work that the organisation and its staff have done in those 35 years. We acknowledge, too, all the aid organisations that operate out of Scotland.

Jim Eadie’s motion recognises the bravery and commitment of the staff of Mercy Corps, the organisation’s reach and the effectiveness of the work that it has done and continues to do. He is right to highlight those aspects.

Rather than consider what is perhaps the expanded world view of Mercy Corps, I will focus on a particular aspect of its work. In a previous members’ business debate that I secured, I drew attention to the plight of those who have been displaced because of the conflict in Syria and made a plea that we should not forget the children of that conflict and the need to ensure that they are not deprived of an education. That area of work has been a focus for Mercy Corps and it has made a significant contribution to that.

As we know, more than 3 million people have been displaced from their homes in Syria. Their neighbours in Lebanon, Jordan, Turkey and Iraq are struggling because services in those countries are overstretched.

Mercy Corps is working to support around 800,000 refugees and is a supporter of the no lost generation campaign by the United Nations Children’s Fund, which highlights the long-term problems of the 1.2 million children who are missing out not just on an education but on stability at a crucial point in their lives. Mercy Corps has made a point of trying to assist adolescents in the refugee and host communities and has highlighted the isolation and lack of social support that those young people often suffer. The situation of girls is particularly difficult, as they are often from conservative communities and become tied to their homes, with no opportunity to acquire vocational skills or to become financially independent.

I must stress why that work is so important. Mercy Corps makes the point that the choices that we make in adolescence influence the paths that we follow in later life. The current cohort of young people is likely to be the one that has to deal with the aftermath of the conflict so, if those young people are deprived of an education, life and work skills, training in business and entrepreneurship and an understanding of community involvement and community life, not only are they being deprived of those opportunities as individuals but the opportunities for rebuilding Syria are being seriously limited. I believe that the issue is that important.

So what can we do? Mercy Corps has suggested a number of areas where additional help would make a difference, and I will highlight just one or two. I mentioned that girls in such situations are often pressured to stay indoors for their safety and because they are expected to do the household chores. Crucially, they need safe spaces where they can be mentored, supported and encouraged to continue their education and perhaps delay marriage and pregnancy.

To come back to education, schools in host communities are overstretched and there is a lack of clarity about things that we take for granted, such as certification and accreditation. There are difficulties of language and stigmatisation. More flexibility needs to be built into the system and communities need to be helped to understand the value that that can bring to their young people and their country.

Mercy Corps is doing a fantastic job, day in and day out, but it cannot do that alone. In this, its anniversary year, it would be good to be able to say that our country, which values education so highly, is with Mercy Corps in the job that it is doing. Perhaps the minister will consider ways in which the Government’s international development budget could assist.

Mercy Corps has branded its work in the area with the tagline “Syrian Adolescents: Their Tomorrow Begins Today”. All of us should want to be part of securing a brighter future for young Syrians. By doing so, we can be part of helping to build a safe and stable Syria, too.

17:38  

Standards, Procedures and Public Appointments Committee 15 January 2015 : Thursday, January 15, 2015
Patricia Ferguson (Glasgow Maryhill and Springburn) (Lab)

Thank you, convener. I have no relevant interests to declare.



Meeting of the Parliament 15 January 2015 : Thursday, January 15, 2015
Patricia Ferguson (Glasgow Maryhill and Springburn) (Lab)

Over the past few days, the people of Malawi have been affected by severe flooding in a number of areas in the south of the country and in Rumphi and Karonga in the north. It is reported that at least 48 people have been killed and that 69,000 people have lost their homes or been forced from them. The President has declared a state of natural disaster and has appealed for international help to provide shelter, food and basic sanitation in the affected areas. It is rightly said that it is the poorest and most vulnerable people who are most affected by climate change. In Malawi this week, unfortunately, we have the proof of that.

I ask the First Minister to say what additional help the Government can provide at this time, and to put on the record the Parliament’s solidarity with our colleagues and friends in Malawi who are struggling to deal with the consequences of the disaster.



Meeting of the Parliament 15 January 2015 : Thursday, January 15, 2015
Patricia Ferguson (Glasgow Maryhill and Springburn) (Lab)

It is probably true to say that no one expects to need the emergency services—we all imagine that it is only others who will need them—but that we feel safer knowing that they are there and ready to bring their considerable expertise and skill to our aid if needed.

When something goes wrong, the police, ambulance service or fire and rescue services are our first port of call. My colleagues across the chamber have spoken about recent tragedies and disasters and the magnificent response of those services. In recent years we have, unfortunately, been only too aware of their worth and value to us.

I want to speak from my own experience of two events that demonstrate the expertise and commitment of the emergency services and explain why I hold them in such high regard.

The first event took place many years ago when I was a teenager, so I will not mention the year. I was awoken by my parents in the middle of the night. At the time, we lived on the 21st floor of a 30-storey block on the Red Road in Glasgow. Fire had broken out on the 23rd floor, two floors above us.

My family was physically unscathed, although we were never to return to live in that home; but, tragically, one 12-year-old boy lost his life. We and our neighbours did what one does in such an incident—we ran down the fire escape to make our way to safety, as smoke from the fire and water from the sprinkler system began to penetrate the building. It was quite a frightening situation.

I mention the event because it occurred to me then, and has stayed with me ever since, that as we were running down and out of the building, the firefighters were running in and up to the source of the fire. They did not know what to expect when they eventually got to the 23rd storey, but it was their job and they would deal with it.

In 2004, a major explosion at a factory in my Maryhill constituency demolished a building, killing nine people and injuring many more. My colleagues Hugh Henry and Hanzala Malik have referred to that Stockline incident.

The initial explosion took place on a Tuesday, but it took until the Friday of that week to recover the last body. With that, the last hope of finding anyone alive was extinguished. For four days and four nights, the fire and rescue services worked in quite dreadful conditions. It was an unseasonably hot May; there was dust and rubble everywhere; and the building was still unstable. I was on the site with the chief fire officer when the last body was found, and I remember well the feeling of what I can describe only as utter despair that hit everyone.

When, a little later that day, my Westminster colleague Ann McKechin and I returned to the site to thank the staff who had worked so tirelessly throughout the week, we were completely taken aback to find that a number of the firefighters who had been involved most closely in the search of the building were very anxious, upset and quite desperate—that is the only word to describe it—to know whether people understood that they had tried their very best. I have to say that no one had ever doubted that, not even for a minute, but the fact is that they are human beings and we must never forget that.

Around the city, hospitals and NHS staff treated the injured, and police officers comforted and supported the families involved. Help was offered and came from around the country; Royal Air Force helicopters ferried the most seriously injured to hospital, and fire and rescue forces from as far afield as Leicestershire brought sniffer dogs and equipment, as did mountain rescue teams from Kirkby Stephen in Cumbria and the Trossachs.

As I have indicated, our emergency services are second to none, but the way in which local people and passers-by rally around is also inspiring. During and indeed after the Stockline tragedy, the normally busy and bustling Maryhill Road was, for a time, completely silent. Local shops and supermarkets donated food and other items to the families who waited for news of their loved ones and to the rescue service personnel. As Hanzala Malik said, the local community hall remained open as a base for the families; indeed, some staff who turned up for work on Tuesday morning did not go home until late on the Friday night as they supported and cared for people who were going through what was the worst experience of their lives. It is therefore important that we remember those who step forward from their daily lives and return to them again with little or no recognition.

It is clear that across this chamber we have nothing but respect and admiration for those whose job often exposes them to danger or to experiences that must haunt them for years afterwards. However, it is not enough to respect and admire them; we must also support them and give them the resources that they need. That is why the Labour amendment calls for an inquiry into the resilience of the services. We need to hear at first hand their views and their ideas if we are to give them that support.

As Hugh Henry has pointed out, Stockline happened because of neglect and the failure to properly maintain one small pipe, but we found that out only at the outcome of the inquiry that was four years after the disaster. We owe bereaved families the opportunity to find out as quickly as is technically possible why such incidents happen and we owe it to the emergency services to understand those reasons, to take action to ensure that such incidents do not happen again and to ensure that we are not asking the people in those services to risk their lives anew. That is why I am pursuing a bill to reform the fatal accident inquiry in Scotland, and I hope that the Scottish Government and colleagues across the chamber will agree not only to the proposal in my bill but to the inquiry that Labour seeks.



Meeting of the Parliament 07 January 2015 : Wednesday, January 07, 2015
Patricia Ferguson (Glasgow Maryhill and Springburn) (Lab)

I congratulate Malcolm Chisholm on securing this debate on an issue about which I know he cares deeply and to which he brings considerable knowledge.

I thank the RCN and its members for their sterling work to highlight a problem with which we are all too familiar, and for doing so in a practical way and suggesting how change might be achieved. I agree with the motion, which recognises the diversity and depth of the roles that nurses play in reducing inequalities. I also want to acknowledge the GP practices and health centres that are categorised as deep-end practices, which deserve our recognition for the work that they do day in and day out.

The inequalities in health across this country are all too evident from the statistics. The average life expectancy of people in my constituency—Glasgow Maryhill and Springburn—is some eight to 10 years less than that of people in communities a mere mile or two away. People in the communities that I serve are more likely to be diagnosed later in the course of an illness or condition, which means that their prognoses are worse and treatment more difficult. When they ask for help, they do not always have the support that would enable them to take full advantage of the services that are on offer.

There are wonderful projects and initiatives that aim to provide such support and which encourage people to become involved in their communities and have more of a say in their lives and in shaping what happens in their areas.

We need to consider the statutory services too, of course, and that is where the RCN report comes in. In some ways, the ideas that it puts forward seem to be quite obvious, but they require changes to processes that are in many cases long established—as we know, changing long-established practice is never easy. At this stage in the development of shared practice, it is helpful to read about the RCN’s ideas and the case studies that it identified.

The six projects that the RCN describes are all interesting and extremely worth while, but I will focus on the project at the Inverclyde homelessness centre. That is not in my constituency, of course, but the project has relevance for us all. Martin Murray, the nurse who is identified in the report on the project, seems to have a good understanding of the issues that face his homeless patients. On a very real level, he understands that the help that his patients need from him is as much about encouragement and support through the process as it is about providing healthcare in its most straightforward and purest form. I know that Duncan McNeil MSP has met Martin Murray and has a great deal of respect for him and his work.

In the interview that he gave for the report, Martin Murray made an important point when he said that

“being homeless is bad for your health.”

He is right. Poverty, addiction and loneliness are also bad for health, and tackling those issues requires the joined-up approach that Martin Murray and his colleagues in the agencies with which he works provide, to offer dedicated, intensive support when it is needed.

However, the services need to be funded in the long term if they are to be worth while. That is what the RCN advocates, and that is what we must support. We must support the RCN in that vital work not just in debates such as this one—important though it is—but in the policies that we advocate in our political parties and, more crucially, in the budgets that we pass in Parliament.

17:25  

Meeting of the Parliament 17 December 2014 : Wednesday, December 17, 2014
Patricia Ferguson (Glasgow Maryhill and Springburn) (Lab)

I congratulate my colleague Paul Martin on securing this very worthwhile and important debate.

The motion is about creating jobs in Glasgow’s east end, of course, but I am sure that the Presiding Officer will appreciate that my constituency stretches from the north-west of the city to the east and that, in fact, at several points Mr Martin’s constituency and mine run along opposite sides of the same road. In any case, a job that is located in the east end of the city may, on occasion at least—with all due respect to Mr Martin—be an opportunity for someone in a neighbouring constituency, too.

Paul Martin rightly identified the good practice that Tesco demonstrated when it opened its superstore at St Rollox, which is now in my constituency following the boundary changes in 2011. Working with local partners, including the much-missed Glasgow North Regeneration Agency under the guidance of its excellent chief executive, Cathy Lang, Tesco went out of its way to prepare and recruit local people for its new store. Even those who were not fortunate enough to be employed by it had the opportunity to learn the basic skills that are needed in the world of work. Over the years, I have spoken to a number of people who used that experience and successfully found employment elsewhere.

Having learned from Paul Martin’s knowledge of what happened at St Rollox, I was particularly keen to ensure that Tesco operated a similar programme when it enlarged its store in Maryhill. I am pleased that it decided to operate a similar scheme there and provided pre-interview training and assistance, for example with CV preparation.

We are really talking about local jobs for local people. I would argue that the constituencies that Paul Martin and I have the privilege to represent contain the best people and the most vibrant communities, but they also have some of the highest levels of deprivation in the country. That disturbs me greatly, and it motivated me to become involved in politics in the first place. Paul Martin is absolutely right when he says that large developments in the east end of the city must also be opportunities for local people and that all agencies and organisations must come together to create more jobs and apprenticeships.

In my constituency, we hope soon to see a major retail facility built on the site of the former North British Locomotive Company works at Carlisle Street in Springburn. The site was cleared in the 1960s and has stood deserted ever since. The proposals that Forge Properties has put forward could spur further regeneration in the area and, crucially, provide a food shopping hub in an area that is sadly lacking in that kind of possibility. New roads and other infrastructure would follow, of course, and some 611 jobs are likely to be created.

I and the local councillors for the area, Chris Kelly and Helen Stephen, want to work with the developer to ensure that jobs go to people in our community and neighbouring areas both during the construction phase and when the centre opens. We will do everything in our power to make that happen. However, we need to ensure that all other agencies are also partners in that work, particularly Jobs & Business Glasgow.

Again, I congratulate Paul Martin, and I sincerely hope that his hard work on Glasgow Fort pays off for his constituents, as his previous efforts at St Rollox did for Springburn.

17:20  

Meeting of the Parliament 17 December 2014 : Wednesday, December 17, 2014
Patricia Ferguson

I appreciate all efforts to encourage and support young people into employment, but the kind of people who have particularly benefited from Tesco’s initiatives are those who have been out of the job market for a long time and struggle with issues of confidence and skills. Those people are probably the hardest to reach—to use a clichéd phrase—but are most genuinely in need of that kind of support.



Meeting of the Parliament 04 December 2014 : Thursday, December 04, 2014
Patricia Ferguson (Glasgow Maryhill and Springburn) (Lab)

As far back as 2009, Transport Scotland indicated to me that Gilshochill station would not be considered because of its relatively—I use that word advisedly—low passenger usage. At that time, it was number 199 out of 343 stations.

If that is the only criterion that can be used, the Scottish Government would be well advised to consider taking up with the Department for Transport the question whether the criteria can be adjusted. Otherwise, stations such as Gilshochill will never be able to qualify for such assistance.

Mr Doris is right that Gilshochill is a difficult station for people to negotiate. Moreover, mothers with buggies do not have access to the assisted passenger reservation service that, fortunately, is available to people with a disability.

Is the minister interested in taking up those discussions?



Meeting of the Parliament 02 December 2014 : Tuesday, December 02, 2014
Patricia Ferguson (Glasgow Maryhill and Springburn) (Lab)

Next Sunday, Glasgow will host the BBC sports personality of the year awards. It will be the first time that that prestigious event has been held in Scotland, and it will provide an opportunity to mark the end of a marvellous year for tourism and a year in which Scotland has shone on the sporting stage. Some 12,000 people will attend the event, which will give another modest boost to our tourism numbers. Those who are present, whether they be athletes, commentators or volunteers, will have the chance to reminisce with the viewing public on the amazing year of sport that we have all enjoyed and the pre-eminent role that Scotland has played in its delivery.

Since the idea of hosting the Commonwealth games was first mooted, the opportunity to secure the widest possible legacy was part of the planning process. It is early days, but initial evaluation suggests that the planning and preparation have paid off. Indeed, some of the early figures are quite remarkable: 250,000 unique visitors stayed in Scotland for at least one night—on average, they stayed for 5.8 nights, which equates to 1.7 million visitor days; 3.4 million people passed through Glasgow Central station; and Glasgow received more than 1 million mentions on social media. That is publicity that we could not afford to buy. In addition, as we have heard, 93 per cent of visitors rated Scotland a good place to visit.

Those are the official statistics, but the story that is told locally bears them out. I regard taxi drivers as good barometers of opinion, and the two I happened to speak to during the games reported a significant increase in business. One of them had benefited from a welcome return fare to Barry Buddon and the other reported that he had transported a couple from England, who had come for the weekend to experience the games and had found out, to their surprise, that Glasgow also had a magnificent civic art collection. They were already planning a return winter break to the city, which they had never previously considered.

We know that 9 per cent of the visitors came from overseas. I had the real pleasure of meeting up with one of my cousins, who had travelled back to his home city from Tasmania, where he now lives, for the first time in 25 years. He was in Glasgow to watch his sports of triathlon and judo, and he was taken aback by the transformation that he saw in the city. We also know that, during August, accommodation occupancy levels in Glasgow were at their highest for a very long time, if not ever. Occupancy rates exceeded 95 per cent and, for five nights of the month, they reached the astounding rate of 99 per cent. We know, too, that the spend was estimated to be around £282 million.

None of that would have been possible without a great deal of hard work and effort. The long-term commitment of VisitScotland, EventScotland and the Glasgow City Marketing Bureau must have contributed hugely to that success, as is the case with so much else that happens in Scotland. Of course, it was not just in Glasgow that we had great success, because the Commonwealth games brought a huge tourism impact to Angus, Edinburgh, Lanarkshire and Tayside, and the Ryder Cup added to that sporting effect. It was not just about sport—it has also been festival 2014, with the Edinburgh festivals, the MTV awards and now the approaching winter festivals that many people look forward to.

I was very keen to hear what the minister would say about themed years. I recall that he and I were both at the opening of the first themed year in 2007 on a cold and wet night in Inverness, when the year of Highland culture was unveiled. I think that the themed years are contributing to the tourism offer in our country, because they tap into the individual interests of people who might want to come here. However, it is important that we herald such years well in advance.

My colleague Duncan McNeil intervened on the minister to talk about a subject that has been dear to his heart for a very long time: the cruise ships that go into Greenock. I suspect that the minister has had the experience of visiting Greenock, as I have, to see what is happening there. The efforts of the volunteers who greet the cruise ships and make the people who are embarking from them welcome have to be encouraged. I was very interested in the fact that, as I understand it from the minister, a Disney ship will visit Orkney. Mickey Mouse might be visiting the Orkney islands, but that is perhaps one ministerial photocall to be avoided.

Bruce Crawford was right to say that we all want to talk about individual events and issues in our local areas, which is a good thing to do. However, it is also good to bring together the impressive jigsaw that is Scotland by pulling together all the separate elements and talking about them in a debate like this.

Alex Rowley and Murdo Fraser brought to our attention a couple of issues—skills and pay—that have dogged the tourism industry for some time and which we have never managed to crack. I would add to those issues the profile and status of the tourism and catering industries, because without them we cannot encourage people to gain the skills; without the pay, we probably cannot attract people into the industry. We perhaps need to concentrate a bit more on that.

John Mason quite rightly identified that people come to Scotland for different reasons. For example, I once had a very good conversation with a gentleman in Marseille who told me that he loved Scotland. I asked him what he loved about Scotland and whether it was our castles or scenery; he said no, it was the fact that Scotland was really grey, which he found very romantic. That is not quite how I see our grey winter days, but it just shows that other people are looking for other things.

Hanzala Malik was right to identify the very real contribution of conferences and sports tourism. That kind of contribution suggests that different parts of the country should identify their niche areas and work hard to develop them to attract visitors.

My colleague Anne McTaggart said that people make Glasgow, and she was absolutely right to highlight that slogan. She also said that she thinks that Glasgow is still better than Edinburgh. I might have wanted to resist saying that I think that “Glasgow’s Miles Better” than Edinburgh—perhaps I should not have gone there.

For me, the Commonwealth games typified the partnership working that makes big events in Scotland and our tourism industry so successful. Graeme Dey was right to remark on partnership working. The games would not have been possible without the hard work and commitment of many people and organisations: Commonwealth Games Scotland, the Government, local government in Glasgow, Glasgow 2014, transport staff, hotel and catering staff, council workers and, of course, the 15,000-plus volunteers, many of whom were visitors to our country, who were such a successful part of the games.

I believe that tourism in Scotland is thriving and has the capacity to go further, but it needs support from us all to do that. On Sunday night, the sports personality of the year awards will identify and recognise the outstanding performances in their field. This might be a partisan point, but I think that there should be special recognition at those awards for the city of Glasgow for all that it achieved during the Commonwealth games.



Meeting of the Parliament 27 November 2014 : Thursday, November 27, 2014
Patricia Ferguson (Glasgow Maryhill and Springburn) (Lab)

Will the member give way?

Vote DetailMSP VoteResult

S4M-12154.1 Lewis Macdonald: Partnership Action for Continuing Employment (PACE) – Supporting Indivi
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YesDefeated

S4M-12120.1 Jenny Marra: 2020 Vision, the Strategic Forward Direction of the NHS—As an amendment to
>> Show more
Not VotedDefeated

S4M-12101 John Swinney: Budget (Scotland) (No.4) Bill—That the Parliament agrees to the general prin
>> Show more
AbstainCarried

S4M-12095.4 Ken Macintosh: Tackling Inequalities—As an amendment to motion S4M-12095 in the name of
>> Show more
YesDefeated

S4M-12095.2 Alex Johnstone: Tackling Inequalities—As an amendment to motion S4M-12095 in the name of
>> Show more
NoDefeated

S4M-12095.1 Willie Rennie: Tackling Inequalities—As an amendment to motion S4M-12095 in the name of
>> Show more
NoDefeated

S4M-12095 Alex Neil: Tackling Inequalities—That the Parliament agrees that a strong, sustainable eco
>> Show more
YesCarried

Selection of John Pentland MSP for appointment to the Scottish Parliamentary Corporate Body.
YesCarried

S4M-12060.2 Hugh Henry: Commending the People who Keep Scotland Safe in Emergencies—As an amendment
>> Show more
YesDefeated

S4M-12045.3 Shona Robison: Scotland’s Future—As an amendment to motion S4M-12045 in the name of Rich
>> Show more
NoCarried

Search for other Motions lodged by Patricia Ferguson
EventIdTypeSub TypeMSP NameParty NameConstituencyRegionTitleItemTextFormattedAnswer DateAnswerStatusIdExpectedAnswerDateAnsweredByMspApprovedDateSubmissionDateMeetingDateProductionStatusIdRecordStatusIdStatus DateOnBehalfOfConsideredForMembersBusinessCrossPartySupportRegisteredInterestSupportCountSupportDateIsEventLinkCurrentMinister
Motion S4M-12189: Patricia Ferguson, Glasgow Maryhill and Springburn, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 28/01/2015 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-12119: Patricia Ferguson, Glasgow Maryhill and Springburn, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 20/01/2015 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-12118: Patricia Ferguson, Glasgow Maryhill and Springburn, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 20/01/2015 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-11838: Patricia Ferguson, Glasgow Maryhill and Springburn, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 09/12/2014 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-11740: Patricia Ferguson, Glasgow Maryhill and Springburn, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 27/11/2014 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-11735: Patricia Ferguson, Glasgow Maryhill and Springburn, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 27/11/2014 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-11717: Patricia Ferguson, Glasgow Maryhill and Springburn, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 26/11/2014 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-11566: Patricia Ferguson, Glasgow Maryhill and Springburn, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 15/11/2014 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-11553: Patricia Ferguson, Glasgow Maryhill and Springburn, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 14/11/2014 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-11385: Patricia Ferguson, Glasgow Maryhill and Springburn, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 31/10/2014 Show Full Motion >>
Search for other Questions asked by Patricia Ferguson
EventIdTypeSub TypeMSP NameParty NameConstituencyRegionTitleItemTextFormattedAnswer DateAnswerStatusIdExpectedAnswerDateAnsweredByMspApprovedDateSubmissionDateMeetingDateProductionStatusIdRecordStatusIdStatus DateOnBehalfOfConsideredForMembersBusinessCrossPartySupportRegisteredInterestSupportCountSupportDateIsEventLinkCurrentMinister
Question S4W-24186: Patricia Ferguson, Glasgow Maryhill and Springburn, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 27/01/2015 Show Full Question >>
Question S4O-03987: Patricia Ferguson, Glasgow Maryhill and Springburn, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 26/01/2015 Show Full Question >>
Question S4W-23605: Patricia Ferguson, Glasgow Maryhill and Springburn, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 10/12/2014 Show Full Question >>
Question S4W-23573: Patricia Ferguson, Glasgow Maryhill and Springburn, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 08/12/2014 Show Full Question >>
Question S4W-23534: Patricia Ferguson, Glasgow Maryhill and Springburn, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 04/12/2014 Show Full Question >>
Question S4W-23535: Patricia Ferguson, Glasgow Maryhill and Springburn, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 04/12/2014 Show Full Question >>
Question S4W-23536: Patricia Ferguson, Glasgow Maryhill and Springburn, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 04/12/2014 Show Full Question >>
Question S4W-23502: Patricia Ferguson, Glasgow Maryhill and Springburn, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 03/12/2014 Show Full Question >>
Question S4W-23506: Patricia Ferguson, Glasgow Maryhill and Springburn, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 03/12/2014 Show Full Question >>
Question S4W-23504: Patricia Ferguson, Glasgow Maryhill and Springburn, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 03/12/2014 Show Full Question >>

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