Jackie Baillie MSP

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Jackie Baillie MSP

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  • Member for: Dumbarton
  • Region: West Scotland
  • Party: Scottish Labour

Jackie is a member of the following Committees:

Jackie is a member of the following Cross-Party Groups:

Parliamentary Activities

Search for other Speeches made by Jackie Baillie

Meeting of the Parliament 30 October 2014 : Thursday, October 30, 2014
Jackie Baillie (Dumbarton) (Lab)

Thank you, Presiding Officer. With your permission, I would like first to pay tribute to Johann Lamont.

I know that members right across this chamber recognise Johann’s passion and commitment to making Scotland a better place. Indeed, all her life she has been motivated by the desire to achieve social justice and tackle inequality, and I know that she will continue to work towards that goal with her many friends and colleagues across the chamber. I also thank her for her notable achievements as Labour leader. Among them is one of my personal highlights, which was securing the control of Glasgow City Council against expectations—and, of course, the most recent is the very successful referendum campaign result. I wish her well for the future. [Applause.]



Meeting of the Parliament 30 October 2014 : Thursday, October 30, 2014
1. Jackie Baillie (Dumbarton) (Lab)

To ask the First Minister what engagements he has planned for the rest of the day. (S4F-02338)



Meeting of the Parliament 30 October 2014 : Thursday, October 30, 2014
Jackie Baillie

I thank the First Minister for his kind comments.

We all care passionately about our national health service and we value the work that our NHS staff do every single day, so today’s Audit Scotland report makes grim reading: progress has been slow; significant change is needed; there is little planning in evidence; services are at risk; targets are being missed; and budgets are being squeezed. Does the First Minister have a plan—any plan at all—to deal with the growing crisis in the NHS?



Meeting of the Parliament 30 October 2014 : Thursday, October 30, 2014
Jackie Baillie

It is evident that the First Minister has read neither the rest of the Audit Scotland report nor Labour’s manifesto, which very clearly talked about

“protecting the NHS budget in Scotland and passing on all Barnett consequentials for health.”

After that answer, it is clear that the First Minister is, indeed, in denial. In his world, everything is wonderful and rosy. However, while we wait on answers, people in Scotland’s hospitals are waiting on trolleys, waiting for an ambulance to turn up and waiting for an NHS that Scotland needs and which people deserve.

Let us look at what the experts say. Last year, the British Medical Association warned that the situation was not sustainable. Today, the Royal College of Nursing said:

“When patient care suffers because health boards are trying to make ends meet, it’s obvious something is ... wrong.”

Moreover, this week, a paramedic said:

“We can’t keep ... up. It’s just a matter of time before something goes seriously wrong.”

Why does the First Minister think that the people who work in the NHS every single day are wrong about the cuts that are facing our health service and that only he is right?



Meeting of the Parliament 30 October 2014 : Thursday, October 30, 2014
Jackie Baillie

I remind the First Minister, who still remains in denial, that, from 2007 to 2010, the Labour Government at the United Kingdom level gave the Scottish Government more money for the health service than he actually applied to the health service.

We detect a pattern. Audit Scotland is wrong. The ambulance drivers are wrong. Doctors are wrong. Nurses are wrong. Everybody is wrong apart from Alex Salmond. However, the facts are clear.

The NHS is completely devolved. We make all the decisions about it in Scotland, and the SNP has been in charge for more than seven years. In that time, bed numbers have been slashed, budgets have been cut, staffing has been cut, waiting times have grown and delayed discharge has been on the rise.

Does the First Minister recognise that the people of Scotland want a long-term plan for their health service, not sticking-plaster solutions? They want a focus on the NHS, not endless discussions about the constitution. Will he deliver, or is he simply in denial?



Meeting of the Parliament 30 October 2014 : Thursday, October 30, 2014
Jackie Baillie

The First Minister is consistent in his fondness for selective quoting, but I say to him that the report overall makes extremely grim reading. We know that the answer that we have just received is not the answer of a First Minister in control; it is the answer of a First Minister in absolute denial. Anybody watching who works in the NHS knows the pressures on the health service. They will not be convinced by his bluff and bluster.

Let us look at the reality of the NHS under the Scottish National Party: almost half a million hospital days lost to delayed discharge; one in four patients in hospital does not need to be there; 325 consultant vacancies—a figure that has gone up 60 per cent in the last year alone; and the Scottish Ambulance Service facing cuts equivalent to 433 paramedics just not being there when we need them or 70 ambulances being taken off the road. Yet the First Minister comes to the chamber today and claims that everything is fine with the NHS. Whether we are talking about his own patch or across Scotland, why is he in denial about the growing crisis in the NHS?



Meeting of the Parliament 09 October 2014 : Thursday, October 09, 2014
Jackie Baillie (Dumbarton) (Lab)

I thank the cabinet secretary for his statement. He accused Mr McNeil of backsliding, but is he not himself backsliding on his vow that the scheme to mitigate the bedroom tax would be in place for April of this year, as promised by him, although it is not yet in place? He will be aware that people are being pursued for arrears of bedroom tax from 2013-14 and threatened with eviction. Given the agreement between the Scottish Government and Labour to fully mitigate the bedroom tax, will he take action to ensure that people in arrears from 2013-14 have their debts removed?



Meeting of the Parliament 08 October 2014 : Wednesday, October 08, 2014
Jackie Baillie (Dumbarton) (Lab)

I am very pleased to bring the debate to Parliament this evening. Robert Watson, who is the chair of the CHAS young adult council, was hoping to be here tonight. If he has made it, I offer him a warm welcome. Robert is a young man with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, which is a life-limiting condition. He and others in the young adult council set up the What About Us? group and lodged a petition in the Parliament calling for age-appropriate respite care facilities. Together with Kyle Kelly, Robert presented that petition to the Public Petitions Committee in November 2013 and made quite an impression on the committee’s members.

However, our timing was truly terrible, because that was the same day as the launch of the Scottish Government’s white paper on independence. One might have expected the Scottish Government to have held off for a day or two so that we could have had some of the publicity, but it did not do so. I do not know why. The upshot was that adult respite did not get as much attention as we believe it deserves; however, I say to the Minister for Public Health that we are not giving up.

I am grateful to members for staying tonight to participate in the debate. There was much banter across the chamber in the previous debate, so let me make it clear that I am working hand in glove with Jim Eadie and Jackson Carlaw, together with Robert Watson and his team, to make progress on age-appropriate respite care.

The members of the CHAS young adults council all suffer from various life-limiting conditions, and many would not previously have been expected to live beyond childhood. However, such have been the advances in medicine that people with such conditions are living much longer—well into their 30s and 40s and beyond. That is a really positive story that we should celebrate.

Nevertheless, it brings with it a challenge. Many members are aware of the exceptional work that CHAS does at its hospices, Robin house in Balloch and Rachel house in Kinross. They are set up to provide much-needed respite for children who have terminal illnesses, and what fantastic places they are. Such is the pressure on their services, however, that they had to take a decision to limit their respite care to people aged under 21. They reckon that that will affect about 40 young people, although other estimates put the figure at 100 young people who will need to find alternative respite provision. Whatever the number is, we need to do something about it, and although it is helpful that there is to be a three-year transition period, that is quite a short timescale to identify suitable alternative care.

Let me touch for a moment on what would be appropriate. This is not about respite care for parents and carers, important though that may be. This is about respite care for young men and women who, just like the rest of us, need to have a holiday, to get away and to be with others of their own age group. Being at home can be quite isolating and—let us face it—we can all do with a break, but for many of those young adults respite care is a chance to socialise with others, and their parents can relax safe in the knowledge that the respite provider has the expertise to deal with their son’s or daughter’s complex condition.

Members who have visited CHAS services will know that they are not sad places, but are filled with laughter and joy. There is always something going on—things to do, people to see and places to chill in. I ask members to imagine that they are an adult aged 21 or over, and their respite care is provided in an old people’s care home or a hospital wing. That is the reality for some younger adults, and it is simply not good enough. That is not to denigrate old people’s care homes or hospitals but, to be frank, respite care that is provided in those settings is more about where there is space, rather than being determined by individuals’ needs.

We need age-appropriate respite facilities. We need a CHAS for 21 to 45-year-olds, or 50-year-olds. Far be it from me to suggest a model, but CHAS’s approach works, and local authorities and health boards have worked with it to develop a funding model and process that has wider application.

There has been discussion with Leuchie house about converting an existing building to provide appropriate respite, and at one stage the Prince and Princess of Wales Hospice in Glasgow was looking at developing new facilities, of which bespoke respite for this age group could be a part. There is no end to the talent and creativity of people in the voluntary sector who want to help, because they, above all, recognise the challenge of transition.

The Scottish Government believes that there is an issue here, too. Its “Living and Dying Well—Progress Report” in March 2012 reported on transition services and stated:

“In many Boards this appeared to be work in progress.”

I am sure that the Minister for Public Health will agree that that recurring comment exposes the lack of adult services to which young people can transition.

It appears that the position has not really improved. In a survey that the Muscular Dystrophy Campaign commissioned about hospice and respite facilities for young adults, 85 per cent strongly or very strongly agreed that respite and hospice facilities are vital for their family's quality of life. A staggering 92 per cent reported limits to respite and hospice provision in their local area, and 93 per cent said that, if respite or hospice facilities were withdrawn, the impact would be “terrible”. We can be in no doubt about how important the matter is.

CHAS has commissioned research, helpfully funded by the Scottish Government, to identify the number of children and young people who would benefit from palliative care, and that research is welcome. Other research will look at end-of-life clinical problems and the impact that they have on families and services. That, too, is welcome.

There is some activity, but I am impatient, and we all recognise that the clock is ticking. We need someone to pull all that together, to drive the discussion forward and arrive at a positive solution, and I can think of no one better than the Minister for Public Health. He has the skills and the understanding to transform adult respite and transition services. [Interruption.] Yes, I am being charming because I want something. I ask him to recognise that the issue is not about party politics; we all accept that there is a need to do something. I ask him to commit this evening to taking this work forward personally. He will enjoy support from across the parties in Parliament if he does so.

In Scotland, we have an opportunity to lead the way by bringing providers and young people together and by developing a national response to the difficulties that people face as they get older. We are talking about a small but growing number of adults who have complex and exceptional health needs. I hope that the minister will say yes tonight, because we can do better and, with his help, we will do better.



Meeting of the Parliament 08 October 2014 : Wednesday, October 08, 2014
Jackie Baillie

Will the member take a tiny intervention?



Meeting of the Parliament 08 October 2014 : Wednesday, October 08, 2014
Jackie Baillie

Does the member accept that CHAS did not choose to do that? Healthcare Improvement Scotland required it, and CHAS currently has a variation in its registration to allow it to take people up to 21.

Vote DetailMSP VoteResult

S4M-11332.2 Jenny Marra: Supported Business—As an amendment to motion S4M-11332 in the name of Fergu
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Not VotedDefeated

S4M-11332.1 Gavin Brown: Supported Business—As an amendment to motion S4M-11332 in the name of Fergu
>> Show more
Not VotedDefeated

S4M-11332 Fergus Ewing: Supported Business—That the Parliament recognises the economic and social va
>> Show more
Not VotedCarried

S4M-11304.3 Michael Russell: Addressing the Attainment Gap in Scottish Schools—As an amendment to mo
>> Show more
YesCarried

S4M-11304 Liz Smith: Addressing the Attainment Gap in Scottish Schools—That the Parliament believes
>> Show more
YesCarried

S4M-11123 Joe FitzPatrick on behalf of the Parliamentary Bureau: Business Motion—That the Parliament
>> Show more
NoCarried

S4M-11114.2 Kenny MacAskill: Policing—As an amendment to motion S4M-11114 in the name of Graeme Pear
>> Show more
NoCarried

S4M-11114 Graeme Pearson: Policing—That the Parliament acknowledges that policing in Scotland contin
>> Show more
NoCarried

S4M-11116.1.1 Patrick Harvie: Scotland’s Future—As an amendment to amendment S4M-11116.1 in the name
>> Show more
NoCarried

S4M-11116.1 Nicola Sturgeon: Scotland’s Future—As an amendment to motion S4M-11116 in the name of Jo
>> Show more
NoCarried

Search for other Motions lodged by Jackie Baillie
EventIdTypeSub TypeMSP NameParty NameConstituencyRegionTitleItemTextFormattedAnswer DateAnswerStatusIdExpectedAnswerDateAnsweredByMspApprovedDateSubmissionDateMeetingDateProductionStatusIdRecordStatusIdStatus DateOnBehalfOfConsideredForMembersBusinessCrossPartySupportRegisteredInterestSupportCountSupportDateIsEventLinkCurrentMinister
Motion S4M-11377: Jackie Baillie, Dumbarton, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 31/10/2014 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-11297: Jackie Baillie, Dumbarton, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 24/10/2014 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-11241: Jackie Baillie, Dumbarton, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 17/10/2014 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-11221: Jackie Baillie, Dumbarton, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 16/10/2014 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-11141: Jackie Baillie, Dumbarton, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 08/10/2014 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-11138: Jackie Baillie, Dumbarton, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 07/10/2014 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-11132: Jackie Baillie, Dumbarton, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 07/10/2014 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-11129: Jackie Baillie, Dumbarton, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 07/10/2014 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-11087: Jackie Baillie, Dumbarton, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 02/10/2014 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-11047: Jackie Baillie, Dumbarton, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 30/09/2014 Show Full Motion >>
Search for other Questions asked by Jackie Baillie
EventIdTypeSub TypeMSP NameParty NameConstituencyRegionTitleItemTextFormattedAnswer DateAnswerStatusIdExpectedAnswerDateAnsweredByMspApprovedDateSubmissionDateMeetingDateProductionStatusIdRecordStatusIdStatus DateOnBehalfOfConsideredForMembersBusinessCrossPartySupportRegisteredInterestSupportCountSupportDateIsEventLinkCurrentMinister
Question S4F-02338: Jackie Baillie, Dumbarton, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 27/10/2014 Show Full Question >>
Question S4W-22819: Jackie Baillie, Dumbarton, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 09/10/2014 Show Full Question >>
Question S4W-22818: Jackie Baillie, Dumbarton, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 09/10/2014 Show Full Question >>
Question S4W-22821: Jackie Baillie, Dumbarton, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 09/10/2014 Show Full Question >>
Question S4W-22820: Jackie Baillie, Dumbarton, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 09/10/2014 Show Full Question >>
Question S4W-22817: Jackie Baillie, Dumbarton, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 09/10/2014 Show Full Question >>
Question S4W-22814: Jackie Baillie, Dumbarton, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 09/10/2014 Show Full Question >>
Question S4W-22815: Jackie Baillie, Dumbarton, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 09/10/2014 Show Full Question >>
Question S4W-22816: Jackie Baillie, Dumbarton, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 09/10/2014 Show Full Question >>
Question S4W-22809: Jackie Baillie, Dumbarton, Scottish Labour, Date Lodged: 09/10/2014 Show Full Question >>