Aileen Campbell MSP

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Aileen Campbell MSP

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  • Member for: Clydesdale
  • Region: South Scotland
  • Party: Scottish National Party

Aileen is a member of the following Committees:

Aileen is a member of the following Cross-Party Groups:

Parliamentary Activities

Search for other Speeches made by The Minister for Children and Young People (Aileen Campbell)

Meeting of the Parliament 08 October 2014 : Wednesday, October 08, 2014
The Minister for Children and Young People (Aileen Campbell)

The children and young people’s summit will bring together children, young people, those who support them and wider civic society. It will provide an opportunity to harness the renewed interest in the positive, energising and consented improvement that we have seen over the past two years. That was personified in the two young women whom I met yesterday at a visit to indi youth in Castlemilk, who are bright, articulate and interested in contributing to decision making.

The gathering will be the beginning of a process that will involve conversations with children and young people taking place around the country. Those conversations will inform future policy and will drive improvement in services for children and young people. The Scottish Government will convene the summit, with the participants determining the most effective way to involve interested citizens at grass-roots level in improving services for children and young people.



Meeting of the Parliament 08 October 2014 : Wednesday, October 08, 2014
Aileen Campbell

Yes. I am happy to confirm that a wide range of children and young people from right across Scotland will be invited to engage in the conversation. We want to hear from children and young people from right across Scotland and we have asked Scottish Government officials to plan on that basis.

At the recent public meeting of the Cabinet that I attended in Arbroath—the member was there, too—I had the pleasure of meeting many engaged children and young people from Angus. We want to ensure that that breadth of talent is involved and that those voices are heard and listened to. We need to capture the momentum that the referendum process has created among our young people and harness it for the betterment of our country.



Meeting of the Parliament 23 September 2014 : Tuesday, September 23, 2014
The Minister for Children and Young People (Aileen Campbell)

Will the member take an intervention?



Meeting of the Parliament 23 September 2014 : Tuesday, September 23, 2014
Aileen Campbell

Will the member give way?



Meeting of the Parliament 23 September 2014 : Tuesday, September 23, 2014
The Minister for Children and Young People (Aileen Campbell)

I thank Gordon MacDonald for bringing this debate to Parliament, and I thank the members who have stayed here to show their support for Dads Rock.

It is nice to be able to welcome Dads Rock to Parliament again. I have been delighted to hear of its success and I congratulate it on winning internationally recognised awards.

As Gordon MacDonald said, Thomas Lynch and David Marshall created Dads Rock back in 2011 because they strongly believed then, as they still do, that dads can and do play a vital role in the upbringing of their children. I wholeheartedly support that view.

I know that most dads want to be fully involved in their children’s lives from day 1. I also know that, at times, some organisations and sectors, including schools, general practitioner surgeries, playgroups and parent and toddler groups, unintentionally make dads feel unwelcome or excluded. As, I am sure, Dads Rock advocates, it is time that that changed.

More and more dads are taking a principal role when it comes to raising their wee ones, often supported by organisations such as Dads Rock. My experience reflects that. I am lucky enough to have unwavering support from my husband when it comes to caring for and raising our wee boy, Angus. I will no doubt have that support when the next one comes along. I can confirm that this bump is a baby, and not the result of a poor campaign diet.

We know instinctively that fathers play an extremely important role in their children’s upbringing. We need to do all that we can do to support and encourage fathers’ involvement right from the start—from pregnancy through to birth, to the early years and beyond. I was at a Sense Scotland conference earlier this year, and one of the most beautiful things that I heard was how a father’s voice can get through to the baby in the womb much more easily than a mother’s voice can, because of the man’s deep bass tones. That is a lovely way in which a father can be involved in their partner’s pregnancy. We must encourage dads to get involved, from pregnancy and right through the child’s upbringing.

In our wide-ranging consultations of fathers and professionals across Scotland during the development of our national parenting strategy, we heard that many fathers did not feel engaged, valued or encouraged to be active and involved parents. What a waste that is. As a result of what we heard in the consultation, the parenting strategy that we launched in October 2012 acknowledged that fathers undeniably should be closely involved in their children’s lives at every stage.

As we continue to implement the strategy, we are working with a number of partners to look at how we can make services relevant and better able to involve fathers more positively in their children’s upbringing. We are looking at how the strategy fits with fathers and what we need to do listen effectively and respond positively to what dads want and need. I know that that is of particular interest to Christian Allard, given his personal interest and his work on the Equal Opportunities Committee.

Through that work, we plan to continue to ensure that services such as health and education and the third sector make dads feel welcome and included. For example, we are working alongside Children in Scotland to look at ways in which our public bodies can ensure more equal treatment of dads when it comes to parenting responsibilities. We are funding organisations such as Fathers Network Scotland to deliver practical support to people and organisations at the front line, who work every day with fathers and families in Scotland.

Working closely with Fathers Network Scotland, we co-chair the national fathers advisory panel, which meets throughout the year to consider how fathers can contribute to the development of policy and practice across the Government. We are constantly looking at how we can better engage dads; most recently, members of the panel have been helping us to restyle our “play talk read” website and our family information service website to ensure that they work in a way that speaks to dads.

That work is all very positive and there are many people and organisations who are working hard to meet the changing needs of families and fathers in Scotland, but we need to go further. We all need to think more broadly about how we portray fathers and how we can improve our interactions with them—how we celebrate them, which Christian Allard spoke about in his speech. Positive messaging about fathers is critical. The media, marketing, social norms, public attitudes and public services all have a role to play.

As Gordon MacDonald, Mary Scanlon and Christian Allard all said, good relationships and positive social networks are as important to fathers as they are to mothers. Indeed, I heard just today of a dad who has set up a new dad and toddler group in Barrhead, supported by the early years collaborative in East Renfrewshire, because he really wanted to provide an opportunity for local dads and their children to meet up, socialise, make new pals and support one other. Cara Hilton spoke of potential projects in Fife. Who knows? Perhaps the Highlands will be the next place on the map, as Mary Scanlon hoped for in her speech.

We need to see more such new initiatives supporting Scotland’s fathers and their children, and we will continue to work with members of the fathers advisory panel, including Dads Rock and Fathers Network Scotland, over the next few months to map the delivery of support groups for dads across the country. That will mean that we will better understand the provision and consider what else needs to be done to fill the gaps, encourage participation and widen access.

However, tonight’s debate is about celebrating Dads Rock and congratulating it on winning the most outstanding baby and toddler group category at the international What’s on 4 junior awards. It really is a great and much deserved achievement for such a young charity. Now in their eighth year, the awards celebrate the best activities, classes and party providers from all over the UK, as nominated and voted for by some 90,000 parents and carers. Congratulations also to Steve Leslie for winning the most outstanding community group volunteer for children and families. What an inspiration Steve is for us all. From across the Parliament, we want to say very well done indeed.

As Gordon MacDonald said, I have had the pleasure of visiting Dads Rock and I was fortunate to attend the opening of its Granton project. I was struck by its sense of fun and its dedication to promoting positive images of fatherhood.

As others have said, Dads Rock was set up by dads for dads, and its playgroups are positive, enjoyable and rocking places to be on a Saturday morning. Just as Cara Hilton’s husband and children enjoy themselves at Dads Rock in Dunfermline, my husband and my wee boy enjoyed themselves when they came with me to visit the project in Granton. I do not know whether Cara has had the chance to sing “We will rock you”, but I was glad that the boisterous singing drowned out my poor attempts at joining in. It was certainly incredible fun, and my husband and wee boy loved their time there—albeit that it was just a short time on a Saturday morning.

Dads Rock took part in the second learning session of the early years collaborative in the Scottish exhibition and conference centre in May of last year. That was a memorable occasion, not least because it had 800 people on their feet singing “If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands”. There was also a serious side to Dads Rock’s participation, in that it shared how, uniquely in Scotland, it brings fathers and children together for fun, music, messiness and—most important—bonding and attachment.

Members should not just take my word for it. Feedback from the dads themselves is much more worthy of mention. Among their comments are that

“Saturday mornings are always about Dads Rock.”

“Saturday mornings are now daddy and daughter day”

and

“I look forward to Saturdays so I can catch up with other dads, and I feel comfortable speaking about dad/male issues with others.”

When asked to sum up Dads Rock in a few words, dads said that it was “a one-off”, that

“there’s nothing else like it,”

and that it is

“Unique, good laugh, good guys, great kids.”

Of course, someone else said that it is simply “rocking”.

I again thank Gordon MacDonald and the other members who have contributed to the debate. I also want to warmly thank Thomas, David, Steve and the rest of the team at Dads Rock for their continued and unstinting commitment to Scotland’s children and their fathers, and I wish them every success for the future.

Thank you, Presiding Officer.



Meeting of the Parliament 20 August 2014 : Wednesday, August 20, 2014
The Minister for Children and Young People (Aileen Campbell) Will the member give way?



Meeting of the Parliament 14 August 2014 : Thursday, August 14, 2014
The Minister for Children and Young People (Aileen Campbell) The Scottish Government is investing more than £280 million over two years to expand funded early learning and childcare from August 2014, to a minimum of 600 hours for three and four-year-olds and the most vulnerable or disadvantaged two year olds: 15 per cent this year rising to 27 per cent from August 2015. That represents an increase of almost half from the 412.5 hours we inherited in 2007, and it will deliver a saving to families equivalent to up to £707 per child per year, which will benefit about 121,000 three and four-year-olds this year.

In the long term, we have set out in “Scotland’s Future—Your Guide to an Independent Scotland” our ambitious plans to transform childcare, which would bring huge benefits to young children and their families.



Meeting of the Parliament 14 August 2014 : Thursday, August 14, 2014
Aileen Campbell I am pleased to confirm to Richard Lyle that we intend to do a great deal with the powers of independence to enhance children’s life chances and to help families. As set out on page 194 of “Scotland’s Future”, in our first budget we would provide 600 hours of childcare to approximately half of Scotland’s two-year-olds. By the end of the first parliamentary session, we would ensure that all three and four-year-olds and vulnerable two-year-olds would be entitled to 1,140 hours of childcare per year. By the end of the second parliamentary session, we would ensure that all children from the age of one to school age would be entitled to 1,140 hours of childcare per year.

Those proposals represent a transformation in childcare that would bring huge benefits to young children and their families. What a great prize to strive for following a yes vote, in contrast to the coalition’s welfare reform measures that will push an additional 100,000 children into poverty.



Meeting of the Parliament 07 August 2014 : Thursday, August 07, 2014
The Minister for Children and Young People (Aileen Campbell) I thank Linda Fabiani for bringing to our attention the outstanding work of Jenny Cook and the fabulously named maw’s mafia: Lynn Morrison, Lesley McGinlay, Elma Ross and Connie Smillie. I congratulate Jenny on her nomination for a Scotland’s real heroes courage award and I congratulate maw’s mafia on their nomination in the carer of the year category.

As Linda Fabiani and other members did, I commend RBS and STV for running the Scotland’s real heroes awards and for the series of programmes that will recognise Scottish people who put others before themselves. As Margaret McCulloch, Stuart McMillan and Margaret Mitchell said, there are heroes in every community and it is great to see them getting the recognition they deserve. How can we possibly choose a winner when we look at the shortlist, which is full of amazing people and inspirational stories? Good luck to everyone on the list, and congratulations to them all.

I congratulate Jenny Cook on being nominated and then shortlisted for the courage award. As we heard, Jenny is a remarkable young girl who, despite on-going health issues, has dedicated her energy and time to raising significant funds to help others. She has pledged to raise £50,000 and has already raised more than £31,000—a phenomenal figure for someone so young to raise. Her fundraising directly benefits the lives of other children who suffer from inflammatory bowel diseases.

Young people do that kind of thing all the time—they want to put back into the system something that will help people who have similar stories. The funds that Jenny Cook has raised have been used to provide days out for young people and their families and to support research. That vital support is making a difference to the lives of sufferers now and in the future. It is evident from the debate that we have all been impressed by the dedication of Jenny, who at just 11 years old is making such an impact on the lives of others. Her selfless work is truly inspirational to us all. Jenny also has a fan in the First Minister, who was delighted to meet her at Holyrood earlier this year; she was his guest at the Commonwealth games opening ceremony.

Jenny’s sterling work has not gone unnoticed. She is a young ambassador for Yorkhill Children’s Charity, and she is part of the Yorkhill buddy scheme, helping to support other young people who are frequent patients at the hospital. She is a radio star too, regularly appearing on Radio Clyde’s Robin Galloway’s Sunday show. “Wee Jenny” now has a high public profile. That has raised the profile of her fundraising activities, which in turn benefits the children who attend Yorkhill children’s hospital and their families. I do not know how an 11-year-old manages to find the time to do all those things. She is truly a remarkable lady, and someone whom we should very much celebrate. It is good that we have an opportunity to do that in the Parliament.

What Jenny Cook is doing is, of course, complemented by the work of the Government and my colleague Michael Matheson to try to help sufferers of inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn’s disease and colitis. We should recognise that work, but of course we are here to celebrate the work that Jenny is doing.

Let me turn to maw’s mafia. I congratulate Elma Ross, Lynn Morrison, Lesley McGinlay, Connie Smillie and everyone else who is involved on the commitment, tireless effort and dedication that they have shown in establishing and running maw’s mafia. Their hard work is benefiting many young people with disabilities and learning difficulties in East Kilbride, including their own children.

The impact of the project cannot be underestimated. The very fact that the family of Stephanie Kelly, an attendee at the project, has nominated maw’s mafia for a real heroes award is testament to how much the project means to the individuals that attend and their families. It should be recognised as an outstanding model of local communities using their assets to deliver a service that meets the community’s needs. We should learn from it to address barriers of isolation and loneliness that other young disabled people may be experiencing in other areas of Scotland. With the legislative changes that we have made as part of our reform of public services—the Public Bodies (Joint Working) (Scotland) Act 2014; the recently passed Children and Young People (Scotland) Act 2014, which I took through Parliament; and the Social Care (Self-directed Support) (Scotland) Act 2013—we should not lose sight of those young people who need support and who, like every other young person across Scotland, want to have their pals about them and have connections with others.

The need to address isolation and loneliness was highlighted in the 2010 evaluation of the same as you? campaign, which told us that only one in three people interviewed was able to name at least one close friend. That is why the Scottish Government, in partnership with Equal Futures and other relevant organisations, held a friendship event in January this year to help people with learning disabilities to be supported to have more friends. It is our intention to plan for more such events this year. However, we cannot take our foot off the gas on getting transitions right and ensuring that simple things such as solid relationships are valued.

Our current strategies to improve the lives of people with learning disabilities and autism and those of their families and carers—keys to life and the Scottish strategy for autism—are underpinned by human rights and principles that are based upon dignity, choice and realising potential. Young people with learning disabilities should have opportunities in their communities that enable them to socialise and be part of the community. We know that having an active social life and feeling included helps to improve health and wellbeing for people with learning disabilities and autism. That is why I am delighted to commend maw’s mafia for giving young people with disabilities and learning difficulties an environment in which they can socialise and enjoy a range of activities and experiences. That work is an embodiment of what we are aiming to achieve.

As well as supporting young people with disabilities and learning difficulties, the Scottish Government is investing in support for carers like Elma, Lynn, Lesley and Connie at maw’s mafia to continue to care for their families, friends and neighbours and also to lead a life alongside their caring responsibilities. That is why this Government has committed significant resources of nearly £114 million to supporting carers between 2007 and 2015. We have also invested nearly £14 million in the voluntary sector short breaks fund, which allows carers, young carers and cared-for persons to take a break from their caring responsibilities and gives them an opportunity to relax without feeling stress or guilt. Over £8 million of that investment has gone into supporting children and young people with disabilities and their carers.

I could not agree more with the speakers today who praised Jenny Cook and maw’s mafia so highly. With their help and with the help of others like them, the Scottish Government will continue to work towards its aspiration to make Scotland the best place in the world to grow up. However, that can only ever be achieved if we work in partnership and truly value the work of our army of volunteers across every community in our country.

I wish Jenny Cook, maw’s mafia, Pat Bannan, Vicki McCarthy, everyone else who has been mentioned and all those who are on the shortlist all the very best at the Scotland’s real heroes awards ceremony in September. I wish Jenny continued success in her fundraising activities and maw’s mafia continued success in running the much-valued service in East Kilbride.

Scotland has a hugely talented army of people doing amazing things for people and creating better lives and life chances for so many, and we should value them. It is a great privilege to be able to conclude this debate for the Government. Again, I thank Linda Fabiani for bringing these two wonderful groups to our attention and for allowing us to celebrate them in an appropriate and highly respectful way.

13:03 Meeting suspended. 14:30 On resuming—

Meeting of the Parliament 25 June 2014 : Wednesday, June 25, 2014
The Minister for Children and Young People (Aileen Campbell) Education Scotland monitors the application of GIRFEC through its inspection programme. The current inspection framework “How Good is our School 3?” includes a focus on the wellbeing indicators in quality indicator 2.1, on learners’ experiences, as well as consideration of the implementation of GIRFEC approaches through QI 5.3, on meeting learning needs. Education Scotland is also supporting schools to develop a shared understanding of GIRFEC and to introduce the self-evaluation tool that has been developed in partnership with the Scottish Government.

The implementation of the Education (Additional Support for Learning) (Scotland) Act is monitored through the routine inspection of schools. Furthermore, Scottish ministers report each year to the Scottish Parliament on the act’s implementation, and that report contains annual statistics and practice information relating to additional support for learning.

Vote DetailMSP VoteResult

S4M-11332.2 Jenny Marra: Supported Business—As an amendment to motion S4M-11332 in the name of Fergu
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Not VotedDefeated

S4M-11332.1 Gavin Brown: Supported Business—As an amendment to motion S4M-11332 in the name of Fergu
>> Show more
Not VotedDefeated

S4M-11332 Fergus Ewing: Supported Business—That the Parliament recognises the economic and social va
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Not VotedCarried

S4M-11304.3 Michael Russell: Addressing the Attainment Gap in Scottish Schools—As an amendment to mo
>> Show more
Not VotedCarried

S4M-11304 Liz Smith: Addressing the Attainment Gap in Scottish Schools—That the Parliament believes
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Not VotedCarried

S4M-11123 Joe FitzPatrick on behalf of the Parliamentary Bureau: Business Motion—That the Parliament
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YesCarried

S4M-11114.2 Kenny MacAskill: Policing—As an amendment to motion S4M-11114 in the name of Graeme Pear
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YesCarried

S4M-11114 Graeme Pearson: Policing—That the Parliament acknowledges that policing in Scotland contin
>> Show more
YesCarried

S4M-11116.1.1 Patrick Harvie: Scotland’s Future—As an amendment to amendment S4M-11116.1 in the name
>> Show more
YesCarried

S4M-11116.1 Nicola Sturgeon: Scotland’s Future—As an amendment to motion S4M-11116 in the name of Jo
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YesCarried

Search for other Motions lodged by Aileen Campbell
EventIdTypeSub TypeMSP NameParty NameConstituencyRegionTitleItemTextFormattedAnswer DateAnswerStatusIdExpectedAnswerDateAnsweredByMspApprovedDateSubmissionDateMeetingDateProductionStatusIdRecordStatusIdStatus DateOnBehalfOfConsideredForMembersBusinessCrossPartySupportRegisteredInterestSupportCountSupportDateIsEventLinkCurrentMinister
Motion S4M-10413: Aileen Campbell, Clydesdale, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 19/06/2014 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-10404: Aileen Campbell, Clydesdale, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 19/06/2014 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-10131.3: Aileen Campbell, Clydesdale, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 27/05/2014 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-09915: Aileen Campbell, Clydesdale, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 01/05/2014 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-09050: Aileen Campbell, Clydesdale, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 17/02/2014 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-08326: Aileen Campbell, Clydesdale, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 15/11/2013 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-08099: Aileen Campbell, Clydesdale, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 29/10/2013 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-07783.2: Aileen Campbell, Clydesdale, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 24/09/2013 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-07083: Aileen Campbell, Clydesdale, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 19/06/2013 Show Full Motion >>
Motion S4M-06960: Aileen Campbell, Clydesdale, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 11/06/2013 Show Full Motion >>
This Member currently holds a ministerial post. First Minister and Ministers cannot ask the Government questions which is why no recent questions are displaying here. Please use the full search to find details of previous questions by this Member.
EventIdTypeSub TypeMSP NameParty NameConstituencyRegionTitleItemTextFormattedAnswer DateAnswerStatusIdExpectedAnswerDateAnsweredByMspApprovedDateSubmissionDateMeetingDateProductionStatusIdRecordStatusIdStatus DateOnBehalfOfConsideredForMembersBusinessCrossPartySupportRegisteredInterestSupportCountSupportDateIsEventLinkCurrentMinister
Question S3W-37735: Aileen Campbell, South of Scotland, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 22/11/2010 Show Full Question >>
Question S3W-36680: Aileen Campbell, South of Scotland, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 04/10/2010 Show Full Question >>
Question S3W-36681: Aileen Campbell, South of Scotland, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 04/10/2010 Show Full Question >>
Question S3W-36118: Aileen Campbell, South of Scotland, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 06/09/2010 Show Full Question >>
Question S3W-36117: Aileen Campbell, South of Scotland, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 06/09/2010 Show Full Question >>
Question S3W-34966: Aileen Campbell, South of Scotland, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 29/06/2010 Show Full Question >>
Question S3W-33118: Aileen Campbell, South of Scotland, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 08/04/2010 Show Full Question >>
Question S3W-32257: Aileen Campbell, South of Scotland, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 09/03/2010 Show Full Question >>
Question S3W-32256: Aileen Campbell, South of Scotland, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 09/03/2010 Show Full Question >>
Question S3W-31807: Aileen Campbell, South of Scotland, Scottish National Party, Date Lodged: 16/02/2010 Show Full Question >>